JP Eats Food Blog. Welcome to my food (and wine) blog. I am very lucky to enjoy good food and wine pretty frequently. I also spend a good deal of time learning and experimenting with both. The point of this blog is to share some of that with you as well as help me remember foods, wines, and little bits and pieces of information I pick up along the way. I rarely take pictures in nice restaurants, so most of what you see here comes from my kitchen, my friends' kitchens, or various casual and local hot spots. You can hit the archive, or never miss a post with rss.



Chambers Street Wines makes Bourbon! Well, not really, but spirits guru John Rankin did go down to Kentucky and pick a barrel from the 7th floor of a Heaven Hill distillery to call their own. Apparently the entire lot sold out in a day… so New Yorkers should forget Pappy or BTAC, this is Fall 2014’s in-demand whiskey.

Chambers Street Wines makes Bourbon! Well, not really, but spirits guru John Rankin did go down to Kentucky and pick a barrel from the 7th floor of a Heaven Hill distillery to call their own. Apparently the entire lot sold out in a day… so New Yorkers should forget Pappy or BTAC, this is Fall 2014’s in-demand whiskey.

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Posted Thursday September 11, 2014 (link) | chambers street wines | bourbon

Lobster roll from Neptune Oyster in Boston. This is the iconic lobster roll, and it always lives up to the hype. Sure it’s expensive, you’re packed into the restaurant like sardines, and so on, but just look at that lobster roll. There’s so much perfectly seasoned and tender lobster packed in that you have to eat with a fork for five minutes just to get to the point where you can pick it up. If only it weren’t four hours away…

Lobster roll from Neptune Oyster in Boston. This is the iconic lobster roll, and it always lives up to the hype. Sure it’s expensive, you’re packed into the restaurant like sardines, and so on, but just look at that lobster roll. There’s so much perfectly seasoned and tender lobster packed in that you have to eat with a fork for five minutes just to get to the point where you can pick it up. If only it weren’t four hours away…

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Posted Wednesday May 21, 2014 (link) | lobster rolls | neptune oyster | boston

Cut away of a Flannery Rib Cap, one of the best pieces of meat in existence.

Cut away of a Flannery Rib Cap, one of the best pieces of meat in existence.

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Posted Tuesday May 20, 2014 (link) | steak | bryan flannery | rib cap

Kentucky Breakfast Stout.

Kentucky Breakfast Stout.

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Posted Monday April 28, 2014 (link) | kentucky breakfast stout | kbs | founders | beer

New wines from Bérèche! I was lucky to get my hands on a couple bottles from this new project of Raphaël Bérèche and his brother Vincent. Can’t wait to give one a try sometime soon.

New wines from Bérèche! I was lucky to get my hands on a couple bottles from this new project of Raphaël Bérèche and his brother Vincent. Can’t wait to give one a try sometime soon.

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Posted Friday April 25, 2014 (link) | bereche | champagne | wine

Spring risotto at Charlie Bird in NYC, with clams, peas, and prosciutto. I’m a huge fan of Charlie Bird, and though I only recently discovered the lunch program, I intend to take full advantage of it this summer.

Spring risotto at Charlie Bird in NYC, with clams, peas, and prosciutto. I’m a huge fan of Charlie Bird, and though I only recently discovered the lunch program, I intend to take full advantage of it this summer.

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Posted Thursday April 24, 2014 (link) | charlie bird | risotto | nyc

Racines NY opened in Tribeca last week with much excitement among members of the NYC wine-loving community. That’s because Racines is co-owned by the folks behind Chambers St Wines, and the wine program is sort of a restaurant-ized version of what you find on the shelves of CSW. That means lots of fantastic and unique wines, young and old, made by small growers and producers, mostly coming from the old world.

I found the wine list to be filled with interesting wines at very reasonable prices (see photo of my happy selection of Francois Pinon’s delicious Vouvray from 2002). It might not be all that accessible to folks who aren’t familiar with the certain styles and regions that are featured, but I would be shocked if the staff wasn’t able to help just about anyone find something to get excited about.

Racines calls itself a neo-bistro, which is a neo term to me. It’s certainly not a wine bar. The food is serious and really very good, focusing on fresh and flavorful ingredients without a heavy hand. My favorite was the veal tartare (pictured), maybe because the place vaguely reminds me of Septime in Paris, and a similar dish was my favorite while dining there. The Mangolitsa pork was also delicious, particularly with that Pinon.

I highly recommend stopping in for more than just a glass of wine; you’ll probably find me there.

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Posted Wednesday April 23, 2014 (link) | racines | wine | nyc

The greenmarkets are finally emerging from winter in NYC. And by that, I mean Lani’s Farm is back. First up this spring is their broccoli rabe, along with a crispy-skinned duck breast from Hudson Valley Duck Farm. Now, where are the ramps? 

The greenmarkets are finally emerging from winter in NYC. And by that, I mean Lani’s Farm is back. First up this spring is their broccoli rabe, along with a crispy-skinned duck breast from Hudson Valley Duck Farm. Now, where are the ramps? 

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Posted Monday April 14, 2014 (link) | broccoli rabe | duck | hudson valley duck farm | lani's farm | nyc

Lobster and truffle fettuccine, a new favorite of mine. There are two versions - full on indulgent (expensive) and quick and relatively cheap. This is quick and cheap, and it’s still seriously good. The wine is Aubert chardonnay, a love it or hate it wine (though, I think most of the haters haven’t actually tried it, but I digress…) that’s a perfect pairing. Here’s how to make the quick/ cheap version of this:
Get and thaw frozen lobster tails from a trusted source—one larger tail per person should do. Start cooking your pasta. Cut the tails at the joints into even segments, season with salt and pepper, then sear for 1-2 minutes in a really hot pan with a bit of oil, turning once. Remove the pan from heat, and spoon out as much of the oil as you can. Add one of those 3oz packages of D’Artagnan (or similar) white truffle butter, and swirl it around to melt. Return to low heat, and once the butter is melted, add half a cup heavy cream. Remove the lobster and set aside. Add the cooked pasta, combine, and, if needed, add up to a cup of the pasta cooking liquid to get the right consistency. Season with salt and pepper. Top pasta portions with lobster, chives, and parmesan.

Lobster and truffle fettuccine, a new favorite of mine. There are two versions - full on indulgent (expensive) and quick and relatively cheap. This is quick and cheap, and it’s still seriously good. The wine is Aubert chardonnay, a love it or hate it wine (though, I think most of the haters haven’t actually tried it, but I digress…) that’s a perfect pairing. Here’s how to make the quick/ cheap version of this:

Get and thaw frozen lobster tails from a trusted source—one larger tail per person should do. Start cooking your pasta. Cut the tails at the joints into even segments, season with salt and pepper, then sear for 1-2 minutes in a really hot pan with a bit of oil, turning once. Remove the pan from heat, and spoon out as much of the oil as you can. Add one of those 3oz packages of D’Artagnan (or similar) white truffle butter, and swirl it around to melt. Return to low heat, and once the butter is melted, add half a cup heavy cream. Remove the lobster and set aside. Add the cooked pasta, combine, and, if needed, add up to a cup of the pasta cooking liquid to get the right consistency. Season with salt and pepper. Top pasta portions with lobster, chives, and parmesan.

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Posted Wednesday March 19, 2014 (link) | lobster | truffle | pasta | wine | aubert | recipe

Flannery lamb saddle with duck fat potatoes and Pegau Chateauneuf-du-Pape. The lamb saddle is prepared like always, sous vide at 134 for four hours than seared and basted in a hot skillet with herbs and garlic at all steps.

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Posted Tuesday March 18, 2014 (link) | lamb | bryan flannery | wine | pegau