JP Eats Food Blog. Welcome to my food (and wine) blog. I am very lucky to enjoy good food and wine pretty frequently. I also spend a good deal of time learning and experimenting with both. The point of this blog is to share some of that with you as well as help me remember foods, wines, and little bits and pieces of information I pick up along the way. I rarely take pictures in nice restaurants, so most of what you see here comes from my kitchen, my friends' kitchens, or various casual and local hot spots. You can hit the archive, or never miss a post with rss.



Spring risotto at Charlie Bird in NYC, with clams, peas, and prosciutto. I’m a huge fan of Charlie Bird, and though I only recently discovered the lunch program, I intend to take full advantage of it this summer.

Spring risotto at Charlie Bird in NYC, with clams, peas, and prosciutto. I’m a huge fan of Charlie Bird, and though I only recently discovered the lunch program, I intend to take full advantage of it this summer.

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Posted Thursday April 24, 2014 (link) | charlie bird | risotto | nyc

Racines NY opened in Tribeca last week with much excitement among members of the NYC wine-loving community. That’s because Racines is co-owned by the folks behind Chambers St Wines, and the wine program is sort of a restaurant-ized version of what you find on the shelves of CSW. That means lots of fantastic and unique wines, young and old, made by small growers and producers, mostly coming from the old world.

I found the wine list to be filled with interesting wines at very reasonable prices (see photo of my happy selection of Francois Pinon’s delicious Vouvray from 2002). It might not be all that accessible to folks who aren’t familiar with the certain styles and regions that are featured, but I would be shocked if the staff wasn’t able to help just about anyone find something to get excited about.

Racines calls itself a neo-bistro, which is a neo term to me. It’s certainly not a wine bar. The food is serious and really very good, focusing on fresh and flavorful ingredients without a heavy hand. My favorite was the veal tartare (pictured), maybe because the place vaguely reminds me of Septime in Paris, and a similar dish was my favorite while dining there. The Mangolitsa pork was also delicious, particularly with that Pinon.

I highly recommend stopping in for more than just a glass of wine; you’ll probably find me there.

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Posted Wednesday April 23, 2014 (link) | racines | wine | nyc

The greenmarkets are finally emerging from winter in NYC. And by that, I mean Lani’s Farm is back. First up this spring is their broccoli rabe, along with a crispy-skinned duck breast from Hudson Valley Duck Farm. Now, where are the ramps? 

The greenmarkets are finally emerging from winter in NYC. And by that, I mean Lani’s Farm is back. First up this spring is their broccoli rabe, along with a crispy-skinned duck breast from Hudson Valley Duck Farm. Now, where are the ramps? 

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Posted Monday April 14, 2014 (link) | broccoli rabe | duck | hudson valley duck farm | lani's farm | nyc

Lobster and truffle fettuccine, a new favorite of mine. There are two versions - full on indulgent (expensive) and quick and relatively cheap. This is quick and cheap, and it’s still seriously good. The wine is Aubert chardonnay, a love it or hate it wine (though, I think most of the haters haven’t actually tried it, but I digress…) that’s a perfect pairing. Here’s how to make the quick/ cheap version of this:
Get and thaw frozen lobster tails from a trusted source—one larger tail per person should do. Start cooking your pasta. Cut the tails at the joints into even segments, season with salt and pepper, then sear for 1-2 minutes in a really hot pan with a bit of oil, turning once. Remove the pan from heat, and spoon out as much of the oil as you can. Add one of those 3oz packages of D’Artagnan (or similar) white truffle butter, and swirl it around to melt. Return to low heat, and once the butter is melted, add half a cup heavy cream. Remove the lobster and set aside. Add the cooked pasta, combine, and, if needed, add up to a cup of the pasta cooking liquid to get the right consistency. Season with salt and pepper. Top pasta portions with lobster, chives, and parmesan.

Lobster and truffle fettuccine, a new favorite of mine. There are two versions - full on indulgent (expensive) and quick and relatively cheap. This is quick and cheap, and it’s still seriously good. The wine is Aubert chardonnay, a love it or hate it wine (though, I think most of the haters haven’t actually tried it, but I digress…) that’s a perfect pairing. Here’s how to make the quick/ cheap version of this:

Get and thaw frozen lobster tails from a trusted source—one larger tail per person should do. Start cooking your pasta. Cut the tails at the joints into even segments, season with salt and pepper, then sear for 1-2 minutes in a really hot pan with a bit of oil, turning once. Remove the pan from heat, and spoon out as much of the oil as you can. Add one of those 3oz packages of D’Artagnan (or similar) white truffle butter, and swirl it around to melt. Return to low heat, and once the butter is melted, add half a cup heavy cream. Remove the lobster and set aside. Add the cooked pasta, combine, and, if needed, add up to a cup of the pasta cooking liquid to get the right consistency. Season with salt and pepper. Top pasta portions with lobster, chives, and parmesan.

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Posted Wednesday March 19, 2014 (link) | lobster | truffle | pasta | wine | aubert | recipe

Flannery lamb saddle with duck fat potatoes and Pegau Chateauneuf-du-Pape. The lamb saddle is prepared like always, sous vide at 134 for four hours than seared and basted in a hot skillet with herbs and garlic at all steps.

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Posted Tuesday March 18, 2014 (link) | lamb | bryan flannery | wine | pegau

Brown butter chocolate chip cookies, or Kenji’s ‘The Best Chocolate Chip Cookies’ from over at Serious Eats. I appreciate the thought and experimentation that goes into Kenji’s recipes and this article was no exception. It’s an interesting read. As for the recipe, we’ve made them twice, and if you’re into the browned butter thing (I sure am), I can tell you they are seriously tasty.

Brown butter chocolate chip cookies, or Kenji’s ‘The Best Chocolate Chip Cookies’ from over at Serious Eats. I appreciate the thought and experimentation that goes into Kenji’s recipes and this article was no exception. It’s an interesting read. As for the recipe, we’ve made them twice, and if you’re into the browned butter thing (I sure am), I can tell you they are seriously tasty.

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Posted Sunday March 9, 2014 (link) | cookies | serious eats | kenji

'Duck Duck Egg' from brunch at Forgione. Two sunny side up duck eggs, crispy skinned duck confit, duck liver mousse, and a giant piece of toast. Breakfast of champions!

'Duck Duck Egg' from brunch at Forgione. Two sunny side up duck eggs, crispy skinned duck confit, duck liver mousse, and a giant piece of toast. Breakfast of champions!

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Posted Friday March 7, 2014 (link) | Marc Forgione | brunch | duck | eggs | nyc

A little slow to post this, but better late than never: Bell’s beers are now in NYC! Bell’s has long been a favorite of mine on work-related trips to the midwest, and now I only have to walk to Whole Foods to find them. 

A little slow to post this, but better late than never: Bell’s beers are now in NYC! Bell’s has long been a favorite of mine on work-related trips to the midwest, and now I only have to walk to Whole Foods to find them. 

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Posted Thursday March 6, 2014 (link) | bell's | beer | two hearted ale | hopslam | nyc

Shoyu Ramen and Roasted Garlic Mazeman from Ivan Ramen Slurp Shop. It took me a little while to get up to Ivan’s first NYC establishment as it’s way up the West Side in the new Gotham West Market (as an aside, why can’t I have a ‘food court’ that awesome in my neighborhood?). If you’re as big a ramen fan as I am, it’s well worth the trip. The roasted garlic mazeman is fantastic—the depth and intensity of the sauce is incredible and the noodles perfect. That much garlic will stick with you for a good 24 hours, though. Even better was the classic Shoyu ramen for it’s delicate yet intensely flavorful broth, especially after upgrading it with chili garlic oil.

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Posted Wednesday January 8, 2014 (link) | ramen | ivan ramen | slurp shop

Lamb saddle from Bryan Flannery. I love Bryan’s lamb saddle, which is the whole boneless loin tied up into roast. This one was cooked sous vide at 134 for four hours then seared in a hot cast iron skillet. Easy and completely foolproof yet worthy of any occasion, which is why I cook one every year around the holidays.

Lamb saddle from Bryan Flannery. I love Bryan’s lamb saddle, which is the whole boneless loin tied up into roast. This one was cooked sous vide at 134 for four hours then seared in a hot cast iron skillet. Easy and completely foolproof yet worthy of any occasion, which is why I cook one every year around the holidays.

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Posted Monday January 6, 2014 (link) | lamb | bryan flannery